TCS Kari’s Law & Ray Baum Act Landing Page 1

Act now. In Effect January 6, 2022

School Phones must be able to Dial Direct 911

An IT LeadershipView of Kari's Law & Ray Baum Act

1. Kari's Law
Dial 911 Requiring NO Other Digits
In Effect Now
2. Kari's Law
Alert Security and Administration
In Effect Now
3. Ray Baum Act
Identify Location of Calling Device
In Effect January 6, 2022
Kari's Law
Tragedy Turns Into Action
The Background of Kari's Law
A nine-year-old girl  dialed 911 four times as her mother was attacked. Not one of her calls went through because the hotel phone required guests to dial a “9” before calling outside the hotel—even for 911.

The Kari’s Law story begins with the murder of Kari Hunt in a Marshall, Texas, hotel room in 2013. Kari Hunt was estranged from her husband and staying with family. She brought her three children to his hotel so he could see them. When she arrived, she and her husband settled the kids down to watch TV and then went into the bathroom to talk privately. In the bathroom, Brad Dunn stabbed his wife 21 times. He then fled the scene with the middle child but was soon arrested with the help of an Amber Alert.

Kari’s nine-year-old daughter, Brianna, tried four times to call 911. But she did not know she had to dial nine first to reach an outside line, so the multi-line phone system in use in the hotel did not allow the call to go through. Lawyers for the Hunt family believe Kari would have lived if her daughter had been able to contact emergency services in the immediate aftermath of the attack.

Kari’s daughter also told two hotel employees that she needed help, but the employees, who spoke no English, did not come to her aid or inform the hotel manager of the situation. For this reason, Kari’s Law requires phone systems to notify the front desk, security office or other designated authoritative personnel when someone has placed a 911 call from the facility. 

Kari’s Law first became Texas state law in the aftermath of the tragedy. Kari’s father, Hank Hunt, mobilized support for the law and worked with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and Congress to help it gain attention on the national stage. One of Consolidated Technologies, Inc.’s partners, Avaya, was also instrumental in bringing national attention to issues the Hunts’ story raised.

Congress introduced Kari’s Law as national legislation in 2017 and passed it in early 2018. The president signed it into law on February 16, 2018 — the 50th anniversary of the first 911 call in the United States. The law would go into effect two years later, so businesses would have time to prepare.

Kari's Law
Can This Happen to
Your Company?
EMERGENCIES IN LARGE FACITLITIES HAPPEN ALL THE TIME!
A nine-year-old girl  dialed 911 four times as her mother was attacked. Not one of her calls went through because the hotel phone required guests to dial a “9” before calling outside the hotel—even for 911.

It’s a situation no company wants to ever imagine: One of your employees suffers a medical episode and is in extreme distress. They phone 911 from their cubicle, and wait eagerly for help. First responders arrive and understand the call was made from your company’s switchboard — but, unfortunately, the precise location of the stricken employee is not recorded, and valuable minutes are wasted while paramedics go from office to office, looking for the ill associate.

Kari's Law
What Is Kari’s Law?
EMERGENCIES IN LARGE FACITLITIES HAPPEN ALL THE TIME!
A nine-year-old girl  dialed 911 four times as her mother was attacked. Not one of her calls went through because the hotel phone required guests to dial a “9” before calling outside the hotel—even for 911.

Kari’s Law is a law set to go into effect in February 2020 that requires multi-line phone systems (MLTS systems) in the United States — for example, those used in many offices, schools and hotels — to enable direct dialing to 911 centers. The 911 calls must go through without the input of additional trunk prefixes, or digits that callers must dial to route the call correctly.

Under Kari’s Law, multi-line phone systems must also notify designated facility personnel that the call has been made. Kari’s Law makes it so people in distress can easily call 911, and first responders can quickly come to their aid. The law also makes it so that office, school or hotel staff are automatically made aware of the situation and can assist in emergencies as well. 

Kari's Law
What Is Ray Baum’s Act?
EMERGENCIES IN LARGE FACITLITIES HAPPEN ALL THE TIME!
A nine-year-old girl  dialed 911 four times as her mother was attacked. Not one of her calls went through because the hotel phone required guests to dial a “9” before calling outside the hotel—even for 911.

Ray Baum’s Act requires telephone systems to provide critical data about the call’s “dispatchable location” to make the caller easier to find and decrease emergency services’ response times. 

According to the FCC, the “dispatchable location” is “the street address of the calling party, and additional information such as room number, floor number, or similar information necessary to adequately identify the location of the calling party.” For a small business, the street address alone is likely to suffice. For large buildings or office complexes, additional information is necessary.

Kari's Law
What Are the Requirements Under Kari’s Law?
EMERGENCIES IN LARGE FACITLITIES HAPPEN ALL THE TIME!
A nine-year-old girl  dialed 911 four times as her mother was attacked. Not one of her calls went through because the hotel phone required guests to dial a “9” before calling outside the hotel—even for 911.

Kari’s Law

Kari’s Law requires these features:

  • Direct dialing of 911: Many multi-line phone systems require users to dial a trunk prefix, such as nine, to direct a call outside the building. If a user such as a hotel guest does not know the prefix and attempts to dial 911 directly, the call will not go through. Kari’s Law makes it so that 911 calls placed over multi-line phone systems will go through, even if the user does not dial the correct prefix.
  • Onsite notification of a 911 call: Phone systems must also notify the office, school or hotel that someone in the facility is placing a 911 call. The notifications must occur at the time the person places the call and can include screen popups with audible alarms for security desks, SMS notifications for phones or emails for administrators. This feature allows onsite staff to investigate the situation and provide additional assistance. It has three main benefits: it benefits the caller by speeding up the response time, the facility staff by providing vital information and the first-response teams by reducing confusion and delay when they arrive on the scene.

According to the FCC, under Kari’s Law, VoIP, or voice over internet protocol, is also covered if the VoIP call originates from a fixed location. Fixed VoIP providers must meet the same requirements listed above. Nomadic VoIP is more challenging to regulate because some users — like those with Skype or FaceTime installed on their phones — may not opt in to location-tracking services.

Kari's Law
What Are the Requirements Under Ray Baum Act?
EMERGENCIES IN LARGE FACITLITIES HAPPEN ALL THE TIME!
A nine-year-old girl  dialed 911 four times as her mother was attacked. Not one of her calls went through because the hotel phone required guests to dial a “9” before calling outside the hotel—even for 911.

Ray Baum

 

  • Transmission of critical data: Phone systems must transmit critical data directly to 911 centers, including data about the “dispatchable location” from which the call has been placed. This information helps first responders find the callers quickly and easily and allows for invaluable reductions in waiting time. 
Kari's Law
How Does My Business Become Compliant?
EMERGENCIES IN LARGE FACITLITIES HAPPEN ALL THE TIME!
A nine-year-old girl  dialed 911 four times as her mother was attacked. Not one of her calls went through because the hotel phone required guests to dial a “9” before calling outside the hotel—even for 911.

Kari’s Law is a law set to go into effect in February 2020 that requires multi-line phone systems (MLTS systems) in the United States — for example, those used in many offices, schools and hotels — to enable direct dialing to 911 centers. The 911 calls must go through without the input of additional trunk prefixes, or digits that callers must dial to route the call correctly.

Under Kari’s Law, multi-line phone systems must also notify designated facility personnel that the call has been made. Kari’s Law makes it so people in distress can easily call 911, and first responders can quickly come to their aid. The law also makes it so that office, school or hotel staff are automatically made aware of the situation and can assist in emergencies as well.